The Live Sheep Trade, Live Cattle Trade and Live Goat Trade | Livestock

Australia is the world’s leading supplier of high quality live cattle, goat and sheep exports to countries around the world, in particular the Middle East and Asia.Many countries across these regions do not have the resources or geography to efficiently produce enough livestock to feed their population. Australia meets the demand for essential red meat protein by exporting livestock for food production and breeding, as well as chilled and frozen meat products.Australia currently exports chilled and frozen meat to the countries we export live animals to. They are complementary trades that serve different needs for the range of consumers in these countries.In many of these countries, tradition, religion and lack of refrigeration means they need to import live animals, which mostly supply traditional markets.In these same countries, our chilled and frozen meat products are sold to five star restaurants, hotel chains and for manufacturing or further processing. Both trades work together to feed people in the countries we export to, and are not interchangeable.The live export of sheep, cattle and goats provides a strong return to the Australian economy – an average of A$1 billion a year in export earnings for Australia since 2005-06 – and a recent report by the Centre of International Economics (CIE) found that 74%, or A$742 million, of these earnings go directly to Australian livestock producers.The CIE evaluation confirmed the significant flow-on benefits exporting live sheep, cattle and goats provides to livestock producers and regional economies, as well as the importance of the live trade in providing producers with access to the broadest possible range of markets.It found that without the trade saleyard prices would be 4% lower for grass fed cattle, 7.6% lower for lambs and 17.6% lower for older sheep, confirming that Australia’s livestock export industry provides benefits for all producers.In 2010 Australia’s livestock export industry provided an important additional market for sheep, cattle and goat producers while underpinning domestic livestock prices.2.978 million sheep were exported to key markets across the Middle East through the live sheep trade during 2010. The largest market was Kuwait, taking 1,076,455 head, followed by Bahrain with 515,731.In 2010 Australia’s live cattle export industry maintained its momentum, exporting 873,573 head with a value of A$679 million. While this volume is 8% down on 2009 figures, the value of Australia’s live cattle exports increased by A$17 million, resulting in industry’s highest ever live cattle export earnings.The cattle trade to the Middle East grew significantly, increasing 134% on 2009 figures. 226,547 head were exported to the Middle East, with figures boosted by the reopening of the trade to Egypt and the establishment of the cattle trade to Turkey. 56,441 cattle valued at A$48 million were exported to Egypt following the reopening of the trade. Live cattle exports to Turkey began in September, with 66,002 cattle exported valued at A$55 million.Despite a drop in volumes as a result of the Indonesian Government’s decision to place greater scrutiny on import volumes and reduce the number of import permits issued, Indonesia remained Australia’s largest market for live cattle taking 520,987 head, equal to 56% of all Australian cattle exports, followed by Turkey and China.In 2010 81,014 goats were exported, contributing $10 million dollars in export revenue. Malaysia remained the strongest market for live Australian goats, taking 67,675 – 83.5% of the total Australian goat exports.

Continuing Education | Education

Continuing education is designed primarily for those wishing to pursue further studies relevant to their professions. It enables professionals to procure a new license, as well as continue to uphold it, as required by their profession. Individuals who may have discontinued their education are able to pursue their studies through various continuing education programs.General continuing education has the same implications as adult learning. It usually pertains to subjects such as literacy, English verbal communication skills, and curriculums such as occupational training or GED training. The syllabus is drawn up keeping in mind the needs of mature learners, specifically students who are already past the usual undergraduate college or university age. It is assumed that a continuing education student has completed basic schooling or some form of formal education.Continuing education is commonly available through a division or a school of continuing education. These schools are sometimes given recognition as extensions of a university or are treated as an extension of a school. In the United States, community colleges also offer these non-credit courses. This means enrolling in non-credit-granting classes, for individual as well as non-professional growth. Continuing education requires part-time enrollment in college or university credit-granting lessons.The need for a licensed education arises because governing bodies in numerous fields, such as law and medicine, have made it compulsory for professionals to hold licenses in order to practice a particular line of work. The objective of continuing education courses is to encourage professionals to further their education and keep abreast of latest developments in their field. Apart from institutes, a few standard colleges also offer some of these courses.Continuing education is imparted in both the conventional classroom as well as in the distance-learning mode. A combination of all of these methods may be used for a systematic continuing education course or agenda. For many individuals, continuing education signifies an opportunity to achieve their aspirations, update their knowledge and acquire degrees that they may have missed earlier on in their life.

Three Steps to Make An Investment Plan | investing

If you invest you need an investment plan. Your chances of reaching your financial goals soar if your investments are based on sound principles and a written plan. Your chances for failure are increased exponentially with every investment planning step you fail to complete.The financial world changes rapidly. Markets go up, they go down. Economies change pace and business cycles fluctuate. Politics, monetary policy, and world events knock your finances off course at a rapid pace.A pilot has a plan before taking off. They run through a pre-flight checklist, make sure they know where they’re going, what to expect from the weather, and what time they need to leave to reach their destination.Can you imagine if your pilot didn’t have a plan? What is your backup if the weather pushes you off course? What if you have a mechanical issue and need to land somewhere else? Every pilot knows ahead of time how to deal with challenges.Investing can be complicated, confusing, and even scary. But a well structured investment plan can take the fear out of investing and keep you on track to reach your goals.Just how do you create an investment plan? Here’s a few short steps to get you well on your way to investing success! These are just a start however and there is much to be learned over time. I recommend reading “Simple Wealth, Inevitable Wealth” by Nick Murray and “The Only Guide To A Winning Investment Strategy You’ll Ever Need” by Larry Swedroe.
Define Your Goals. You need to know where your going to figuring out how to get there. What are you investing for? Retirement? The kids college? A large purchase? Once you define your goals you can calculate how much it will take to achieve them. Vanguard.com has some excellent investment calculators.
Create Your Investment Policy: An Investment Policy Statement (IPS) is a document which defines the parameters for which you’ll invest. It should be in writing and it’s a very important part of your investment plan management. It helps you avoid ad hoc revisions to an otherwise well thought out investment strategy and provides a framework for making wise investing decisions in the future. Your Investment Policy Statement should detail the types of investments you’ll own, how you’ll select the managers for your investments (which mutual funds or ETF’s may be purchase), how you’ll replace those investments when necessary, what percentages of which asset classes will be purchased, when you’ll need to draw income and how much, how you’ll manage and monitor your investments, when you’ll re-balance your portfolio.
Manage, Monitor and Maintain: Finally it’s not enough just to invest your money and forget about it! Investing takes time and you should schedule a portfolio investment review at least annually if not semi-annually.
Each investment review should track your current investment assets against a benchmark of where you should be in order to meet your goals. It should also prompt a fresh round of due diligence and an asset allocation check on your investments. Mutual funds or ETF’s which were once great may have fallen out of favor, and because the world changes so rapidly it’s a certainty that your asset allocation will have changed which may require adjusting.The important thing to remember is that if your investment plan was created properly up front, you should continue to have faith and confidence in it – yet the process will need to be monitored and refined. Make changes and adjustments over time as your financial situation changes, but never make emotional random changes in response to market fluctuations.